Bubble Project

Image 13, The Bubble Project (Detail), Project X Installation Series, Naccarato, Montreal, QC, 2007
Bubble Project (Detail), Project X Installation Series, Naccarato, Montreal, QC, 2006

White Rain

White Rain, Project X Installation Series, Naccarato, Montreal, QC, 2007
White Rain, Project X Installation Series, Naccarato, Montreal, QC, 2007

Looking Glass

(01) Looking Glass, Project X Installation Series, Naccarato, Montreal, QC, 2008
Looking Glass, Project X Installation Series, Naccarato, Montreal, QC, 2008

About Project-X

The Project-X Installation Series (2006-2008) evolved during my BFA (Bachelor of Arts) degree at Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada (2005-2008). The Series was made up of three installations: the Bubble Project (2006), White Rain (2007),  and Looking Glass (2008).

Thoughts on Project-X

Roy Ascott points out in Telematic Embrace: Visionary Theories of Art, Technology, and Consciousness that “the artist, instead of creating, expressing, or transmitting content, is now involved in the designing of context: contexts within which the observer can construct experience and meaning” (Ascott 279).

Such a paradigm shift profoundly alters the relationship between observer and art. The observer no longer acts as a passive participant, their gaze directed to an event or object.

The possibility exists for the merging of technology and art so that the artist and observer both interact within the event and/or in the creation of the art object.

The artist’s role becomes one of mediating the juxtaposed realities of real and unseen – a sort of a modern day shaman who creates structural nodes or doorways of experience.

As web-based media moves towards a passive, opaque, interactive technology – fueled by corporate interests such as Facebook, YouTube, and MySpace (social networking) or Google (dissemination of information) – our experiences and interactions become selectively depended on coded software. This, in turn, predetermines how, where and who, we interact with. If we look further at the field of Bio-Technology, where genetic coding has begun redefining what we eat, and who we are – the need for intervention is urgent.

Therefore, by merging and/or creating relationships between art mediums and technology through interactive and immersive based installations/environments – I wish to facilitate and recreate dynamic points of interactivity between the artist and participants. By allowing the work to remain transparent, that is, by allowing the participant to be aware of the technological process, I wish to create an understanding of the role technologically plays in our lives.

Naccarato, 2005

Ascott, Roy. Telematic Embrace: Visionary Theories of Art, Technology, and Consciousness. Ed. Edward A. Shanken. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2003.